SAVE LIVES TODAY

Every day in Australia, 
20 Australians die of heart attack. 

Leaving unfinished projects. Unsaid words.  

Acts of love cut short. 

Every day in Australia, 
20 Australians die of heart attack. 

Leaving unfinished projects. Unsaid words. 

Acts of love cut short. 

  $50  

Could cover the cost of basic tools researchers need to grow heart cells: syringes, test tubes and culture flasks.

Could pay for a DNA test that can help determine genetic factors that can identify people at high risk of heart disease.

 $100  

Could pay for a blood test to identify underlying factors involved in heart disease eg: measuring the levels of lipids (fats), cholesterol and white blood cells.

 $75 

 Help fund ground 
breaking research 

Right now, we are investing in more than 200 cardiovascular research projects through universities, hospitals and medical research bodies across the nation. 

Join us in the fight against Australia’#1 killer.  Donate today. 

20 people 
die each day in Australia due to heart attack

In 2017-18: 
57,368 Australians 
hospitalised due to heart attack

Every 9 minutes one person was admitted to hospital for a heart attack on average

HELPLINE 
13 11 12 

Right now, we are investing in more 
than 200 cardiovascular research 
projects through universities, 
hospitals and medical research bodies across the nation. 

Donate today. 

NATIONAL HEART FOUNDATION OF AUSTRALIA ABN 98 008 419 761

For heart health information and support, call our Helpline on 13 11 12 or visit heartfoundation.org.au

SAVE LIVES TODAY

Every day in Australia, 
20 Australians die of heart attack. 

Leaving unfinished projects. Unsaid words.  

Acts of love cut short. 

Every day in Australia, 20 Australians die of heart attack. 

Leaving unfinished projects. Unsaid words.

Acts of love cut short. 

SAVE LIVES TODAY

Acts of love can be everyday things: like writing a love note to our partner - or they can be grand gestures: like planning a surprise party for a friend.

Kylie, a fit and healthy 48-year-old, had a massive heart attack while at a concert with her husband. She’d bought the tickets to the Guns N’ Roses concert as a surprise for his 40th birthday.  Her act of love cut short. They didn’t even make it to their front-of-stage seats. 

“I was a heart attack waiting to happen, and I had no clue.” - Kylie  

Kylie was one of the lucky ones.  Medics treated her on the scene and rushed her to hospital where she underwent lifesaving surgery. 

“I was a heart attack waiting to happen, and I had no clue.” - Kylie  

Kylie was one of the lucky ones.  
Medics treated her on the scene and rushed her to hospital where she underwent lifesaving surgery. 
 

SAVE LIVES TODAY

Kylie, a fit and healthy 48-year-old, had a massive heart attack while at a concert with her husband. She’d bought the tickets to the Guns N’ Roses concert as a surprise for his 40th birthday.  

Her act of love cut short. They didn’t even make it to their front-of-stage seats.

You can help fund the pathway 
to new discoveries... 

“Kylie’s heart attack should not have been the first sign 
there 
was something wrong with her heart.” Associate Professor Duncan (Jock) Campbell 
 
Associate Professor Campbell and his team are investigating 

cutting-edge strategies and tools that have the potential to allow us to better predict heart conditions before they result in serious conditions like a heart attack. 

This could lead to the development of a new prediction tool for heart disease in Australians: the first of its kind in decades. 

Your donation today will help continue to support truly promising research projects, like the work of Associate Professor Duncan Campbell

This research – brings us one step closer to beating heart disease and saving the lives of more Australians like Kylie.  

"Researchers like me rely on generous donors like you to help us help fund our ground-breaking research. Thank you!"

You can help fund the pathway to new discoveries... 

“Kylie’s heart attack should not have been the first sign there was something wrong with her heart.” Associate Professor Duncan (Jock) Campbell 
 
Associate Professor Campbell and his team are investigating 

cutting-edge strategies and tools that have the potential to allow us to better predict heart conditions before they result in serious conditions like a heart attack. 

This could lead to the development of 
a new prediction tool for heart 
disease in Australians: the first of its kind in decades. 

Your donation today will help continue to support some of truly promising research projects, like the work of Associate Professor Duncan Campbell. And this research – brings us one step closer to beating heart disease and saving the lives of more Australians like Kylie.  

DONATE TODAY